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U.S. Army unveils new chemical detection sensor package for Stryker and UGV

The U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command Chemical Biological Center has unveiled the new chemical detection sensor package for Stryker and UGV.

A snowy, frigid February morning didn’t stop leaders and stakeholders from turning out to view the highly anticipated Stryker Nuclear, Biological and Chemical Reconnaissance Vehicle (NBCRV) Sensor Suite Upgrade program demonstration at the Combat Capabilities Development Command (CCDC) Chemical Biological Center.

The NBCRV demonstration provided a first look for many at the brand new suite of chemical sensors deployed on the NBCRV, a huge leap forward in terms of capabilities for not only the vehicle but for CBRNE Soldiers tasked with operating and carrying out missions using the NBCRV.

“We’re not writing about the future, we’re not thinking about the future, we’re building the future,” Lt. Col. Jeffrey Strauss of the Joint Program Executive Office for Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defense (JPEO-CBRND), Joint Project Manager for Nuclear, Biological and Chemical Contamination Avoidance (JPM NBC CA) said during his opening remarks to the audience of more than 50 people.

For years, Soldiers have used the Stryker, an eight-wheeled armored fighting vehicle and true workhorse of the Army, to address chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear (CBRN) threats on the battlefield. When modified with CBRN chemical detection sensors, the Stryker is known as the Stryker Nuclear, Biological and Chemical Reconnaissance Vehicle or NBCRV.

Currently, CBRN Soldiers investigate potential CBRN threats at close range from a slow-moving or completely stopped vehicle, sometimes directly exposing the vehicle to the threat in order to conduct sampling and often creating an easy target for the enemy. It was clear to many in the Science and Technology (S&T) community, the CBRNE community and the Army that the NBCRV had opportunities for modernization.

“This capability is meant to operate outside the threat,” Scott Kimmel, Deputy Commandant of the U.S. Army CBRN School …read more

Read more here:: Defence Blog (Land)

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